Research-to-Practice Spotlight Series

  • 2017 Series

    The 2017 Research-to-Practice Spotlight series highlights four colleges of education and their PK-12 partners providing effective clinical practice programs. It features George Mason University (VA), St. John’s University (NY), the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and California State University Long Beach. In these segments, educator preparation faculty, teacher candidates, and graduates join PK-12 school administrators, mentor teachers, and students to share their perspectives on why and how to create a far-reaching learning community.

    University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    • Clinical Partnerships at UNLV: An Overview
    • University of Nevada, Las Vegas

      Clinical Partnerships at UNLV: An Overview

      The College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) offers its educator candidates clinical experiences through a variety of partnerships, which also support other students, faculty, and members of the local education community in what Dean Kim Metcalf describes as a “natural laboratory” environment. A partnership with the Clark County School District, cultivated over the past decade, thrives through deliberate and open communication across both formal and informal channels. The latest outgrowth of this partnership is a new initiative for research and clinical experience in Paradise Elementary School. Another long-standing partnership is with the inclusive preschool on campus, which serves the wider community and provides learning opportunities for both students and researchers across the university.

    St. John’s University

    • Relationship Building and Shared Community
    • Helping Candidates Find Their Voice
    • Achieving Professional Readiness Through Practice
    • On-Site Methods Classes Open Many Doors
    • The Benefits of the Yearlong Coteaching Model
    • St. John’s University

      Relationship Building and Shared Community

      This series showcases the work of the Residential Internship for St. John’s Educators (RISE) program, a partnership-driven clinical program that provides teacher candidates a yearlong internship while building relationships among the St. John’s University School of Education, the New York Department of Education, and the local schools in Queens, New York. This first segment highlights the RISE program’s shared professional community and strong relationships, enabled by small class sizes and mutually beneficial partnerships.

    • St. John’s University

      Helping Candidates Find Their Voice

      Interns, cooperating teachers and administrators, and faculty involved with the St. John’s University RISE Program discuss the program’s approach to helping candidates develop their own teaching style and professional voice. Candidates describe the benefits of being immersed in the school environment for building their confidence and identity as teaching professionals, and faculty and mentors explain how they balance clear expectations for outcomes with the flexibility for candidates to put their own spin on lessons.

    • St. John’s University

      Relationship Building and Shared Community

      The St. John’s University RISE Program provides teacher candidates a progression of opportunities to develop from novices to classroom-ready professionals. In this video segment, interns express appreciation for the chance to participate in the school from Day 1, observe before taking ownership for teaching, and develop their own relationships with students and their families. Candidates say they’ve learned that “readiness” largely entails a deep awareness of the complexity of the job and an ability to be nimble and flexible in that environment.

    • St. John’s University

      On-Site Methods Classes Open Many Doors

      This segment explores the benefits of holding methods classes on site in partner schools and applied in active classrooms. St. John’s faculty describe the value of combining theory and practice in a “real” setting for authentic practice. A partner school principal says the university faculty are far from intrusive in the school – in fact, they participate as integrated members of the professional community. And the interns appreciate the real-time feedback from their professors on their practice.

    • St. John’s University

      The Benefits of the Yearlong Coteaching Model

      Dean Michael Sampson, Curriculum & Instruction Chair Judith McVarish, and other leaders at St. John’s University discuss the popularity of the yearlong RISE Program and its power as a recruitment tool. Cooperating teachers and administrators chime in on the value of the program’s length and of having interns develop in-depth knowledge of their classroom, which gives students an extra knowledgeable adult to attend to their learning needs. Interns themselves see this benefit as well as the asset of having a younger voice in the classroom.

    George Mason University

    • Embedding Learning in the Professional Community
    • Building a Community of Mentors
    • Creating a Framework for Critical Feedback
    • Promoting Continuous Learning
    • Fostering an Exchange of Ideas
    • Collaborating in the Classroom
    • Producing Successful New Teachers
    • Understanding the Student Perspective
    • Appreciating the Education Profession
    • George Mason University

      Embedding Learning in the Professional Community

      This series highlights the work of the George Mason University (GMU) College of Education and Human Development in partnership with local schools in Fairfax County, Virginia, to create practical learning experiences for teacher candidates. The GMU program is a professional development school (PDS) model in which candidates are fully embedded as members of schools’ teaching community. In this first segment, GMU faculty and students are featured along with Principal Adam Erbrecht of Daniels Run Elementary School and his staff and Principal Linda Ferguson of Westlawn Elementary School and her staff. They all share insights on what makes their partnership successful and why the results of the PDS model are worth the effort.

    • George Mason University

      Building a Community of Mentors

      Learn about the team-building approach used by faculty at George Mason University’s College of Education and Human Development to create strong relationships with partner schools. Leadership teams at the university and local school sites plan robust training programs for teacher candidates a year in advance, including individualized development plans.

    • George Mason University

      Creating a Framework for Critical Feedback

      In this segment, teacher candidates at George Mason University share effective ways the PDS program provides quality support and real-time, specific feedback throughout their practicum in the classroom. The university students are assigned a representative, site facilitator, and mentor teacher to guide their learning experience. In addition, Mason’s College of Education and Human Development provides courses for prospective mentor teachers to learn about their role and resources available for supporting teacher candidates.

    • George Mason University

      Promoting Continuous Learning

      In this segment, George Mason University’s PDS partners discuss how interns evoke reflection and rejuvenation of practice among in-service teachers. Through the questions the candidates raise and ideas they offer, mentor teachers are prompted to articulate their decisions and consider new perspectives and strategies for approaching their daily work. Simultaneously, teacher candidates gain exposure to professional teaching and hands-on experience with classroom management, content delivery, assessment and reflection, and more.

    • George Mason University

      Fostering an Exchange of Ideas

      In this segment, teacher educators and preservice teachers at George Mason University share the value of working with local school districts involved in the PDS program. The teacher candidates have the opportunity to shadow in-service teachers interested in mentoring. Based on compatible backgrounds and interests, the teacher candidates are paired with their teacher mentors. Learning experiences are provided for all involved in the PDS program. Educators at Mason’s College of Education and Human Development stay authentic in their research and instruction by being connected to what is relevant in the real world of teaching in local schools. Teacher candidates gain experience with understanding and managing various student demographics and learning challenges. In-service teachers are exposed to the latest techniques available in the field from teacher candidates.

    • George Mason University

      Collaborating in the Classroom

      In this segment, teacher candidates and mentor teachers share the benefits of having multiple teachers in the classroom through the George Mason University PDS 1-year program. Through collaboration, teacher candidates bring a new perspective and insight on 21st century learning to in-service teachers. Mentor teachers are able to provide feedback and help candidates become comfortable in the classroom and learn how to become an effective teacher in the future.

    • George Mason University

      Producing Successful New Teachers

      In this segment, teacher candidates reflect on their experience as interns with local schools involved in the PDS program. Students from George Mason University are prepared for their own classroom after concluding their program with independent teaching that provides growth and feedback from their mentor teacher. Many fellow teacher candidates become new hires at their PDS and continue to have a mentor throughout their first year to continue their growth as a teacher.

    • George Mason University

      Understanding the Student Perspective

      In this segment, we hear from the group of people educators hope to benefit the most through the PDS model – the students. First graders at Daniels Run Elementary School share their insights on having teacher candidates in the classroom throughout the full school year. At a young age, these students have an understanding of the partnership between George Mason University and its local professional development schools. Furthermore, the students acknowledge the hard work teacher candidates do in their classroom and look up to them as role models.

    • George Mason University

      Appreciating the Education Profession

      In this segment, fourth grade students from Westlawn Elementary School express their appreciation for teacher candidates participating in the PDS program at their school. They enjoy having another teacher in the classroom, with another teaching style, who wants to help them succeed. Students weigh in on how the program has benefited their learning and recognize their own role in helping teacher candidates throughout the school year. Students also offer advice for future teachers entering the workforce.

  • 2016 Series

    The 2016 Research-to-Practice Spotlight Series focuses on operationalizing clinical practice to continuously improve the preparation of teachers. This spotlight highlights the active interchange of theory and practice in a yearlong coteaching program with far-reaching impact from within the college of education to the local community and beyond. In this feature of Ohio University’s Patton College, educator preparation faculty, teacher candidates, graduate teaching fellows, PK-12 school administrators, teachers, and students share effective strategies for implementing an award-winning clinical practice model that successfully prepares educators and improves PK-12 student learning.

    Ohio University

    • Creating Partnerships
    • Improving Student Learning
    • Building Relationships
    • Nurturing Community
    • Learning by Doing
    • Creating Active and Reflective Educators
    • Developing Support Systems
    • Growing Together
    • Sharing Knowledge
    • Preparing for the Future
    • Unifying the Profession Through Clinical Partnerships
    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Creating Partnerships

      In this segment, PK-12 administrators from the Patton College’s partner schools share lessons on developing effective partnerships between school districts and colleges of education. Superintendent George Wood of Federal Hocking Local Schools, Principal Roger Nott of Trimble Elementary School, Principal Cliff Bonner of Federal Hocking Local Schools, Principal Penny McDowell of Morrison-Gordon Elementary School, and Principal Heather Skinner of The Plains Elementary School offer advice for building quality working relationships that are mutually beneficial.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Improving Student Learning

      In this segment, PK-12 administrators from the Patton College’s partner schools share lessons on developing effective partnerships between school districts and colleges of education. Superintendent George Wood of Federal Hocking Local Schools, Principal Roger Nott of Trimble Elementary School, Principal Cliff Bonner of Federal Hocking Local Schools, Principal Penny McDowell of Morrison-Gordon Elementary School, and Principal Heather Skinner of The Plains Elementary School offer advice for building quality working relationships that are mutually beneficial.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Building Relationships

      In this video segment, AACTE’s Rodrick Lucero interviews faculty and teacher candidates at Ohio University’s Patton College of Education on how to build sustainable relationships through clinical practice partnerships. Department Chair Frans Doppen, Professor Ginger Weade, Faculty Coordinators Bill Elasky and Cindy Hartman, teacher candidates Joe Liptrop and Allison Cislo, and teaching fellow Zach Pierson discuss effective strategies for recruiting stakeholders’ support and how to meet their needs.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Nurturing Community

      Discover how faculty and teacher candidates at Ohio University’s Patton College of Education have nurtured a strong sense of community with local school districts in Athens County. Learn how their clinical model prepares future teachers both for the classroom and for developing caring support systems outside of the classroom that encourage student learning. Hear from teacher candidates about how their early involvement and investment in PK-12 students has helped to define their roles as educators.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Learning by Doing

      In this segment, Patton College of Education faculty, students, and partner school personnel discuss the importance of improving pedagogy through practical experience. Through the mentorship and modeling provided by in-service teachers, the teacher candidates learn firsthand what to do, how to do it, and how to improve on their practice. Exposure to the responsive classroom approach and to students learning language has helped to strengthen the teacher candidates’ ability to resolve problems and teach in any setting.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Creating Active and Reflective Educators

      Teacher candidate John Frasca shares his inspiring story of why he chose to pursue the teaching profession through the Patton College of Education at Ohio University. Learn how the university’s Creating Active and Reflective Educators (CARE) program helps to effectively recruit and retain teachers and to facilitate job placement in partnering school districts.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Developing Support Systems

      Developing supportive relationships is critical to the successful implementation of clinical practice programs. In this video, Patton College faculty and partner schools discuss the support of school administrators and other leaders, at both the university and local school levels, and their importance for enhancing student learning.

    • Patton College’s local PK-12 school administrators

      Growing Together

      In this video, administrators of the Patton College of Education’s partner schools discuss the benefits of the clinical practice partnership for their teachers and students. Elementary principals Heather Skinner, Roger Nott, and Penny McDowell explain that teacher candidates bring new ideas and serve as valuable resources for PK-12 students, such as by providing quality intervention for children with reading gaps in English language arts.

    • Patton College faculty and partner school personnel

      Sharing Knowledge

      In this video segment, Patton College faculty and partner school personnel discuss how clinical practice facilities innovative exchange between mentor teachers and teacher candidates. Hear how teacher candidates inspire in-service teachers to continuously reflect on their teaching practices. Discover ways the coteaching model provides opportunities for university students to implement fresh pedagogical practices in the classroom incorporating technology and other innovations.

    • Patton College of Education faculty and students

      Preparing for the Future

      In this clip, Patton College of Education faculty and students describe what an effective clinical practice model looks like. Teacher candidates share how having access to the same classrooms over the course of a year or more has helped them to develop long-term, meaningful relationships with administrators, in-service teachers, and PK-12 students. Candidates also address challenges of practice in their methods courses for a deeper understanding of good teaching practice.

    • Dean Renee Middleton and Director of Professional Development School Partnerships Marcy Keifer Kennedy

      Creating a Unified Profession through Collaboration – Acting as One

      In this segment, Dean Renée Middleton and Director of Professional Development School Partnerships Marcy Keifer Kennedy of Ohio University’s Patton College of Education discuss the mutual benefits of their clinical practice partnerships. This spotlight focuses on the importance of collaboration for the implementation of these programs. Middleton explains that by truly committing to what clinical practice means, institutions learn to work collaboratively and lose their territorial stigmas. Kennedy says the relationship between faculty at Ohio University and teachers/administration at the PK-12 partner schools is vital in being able to carry out the clinical practice program. Both professionals agree that what affects higher education affects PK-12 and vice versa; ultimately all decisions must focus on how they will affect PK-12 learners.

  • 2015 Series

    The 2015 Research-to-Practice Spotlight Series focuses on building partnerships for clinical preparation. This spotlight presents a general overview of the importance of quality teaching, factors that lead to successful clinical preparation programs, and the journey of candidates into the profession. Featuring programs from Colorado State University, researchers, educator preparation faculty, and graduates share their knowledge and experiences for implementing innovative practices for building effective clinical practice and professional development.

    Colorado State University

    • Theory to Practice
    • Model of Clinical Practice
    • Coteaching Trios
    • A New Teacher’s Journey
    • Preparing Teachers for Diverse Students and Settings
    • Advice on Partnership Building
    • Why I Teach
    • Jennifer Roth | Colorado State University

      Theory to Practice

      In this segment, AACTE Vice President Rod Lucero interviews Assistant Principal Jennifer Roth about the unique principal leadership opportunities cocreated by Colorado State University (CSU) and the Poudre School District. Roth began her career as a foreign language classroom teacher, served as dean of students at Fort Collins High School, taught as an on-site instructor for the teacher leadership program, and now serves as assistant principal at the high school, where she leads the new teacher academy. She also is a doctoral candidate in principal leadership at CSU.

    • Fort Collins PDS Partners

      Model of Clinical Practice

      This video captures perspectives of several university faculty, students, PK-12 cooperating teachers, and school leaders discussing the professional development school model of clinical practice employed in Fort Collins schools by Colorado State University’s School of Teacher Education and Principal Preparation. They share both challenges and rewards of their innovative practice, and explain how it has fundamentally changed how they look at teacher preparation.

    • Colorado State University

      Coteaching Trios

      This installment of AACTE’s Research-to-Practice Spotlight explores the innovative coteaching model of student teaching newly employed by Colorado State University, offering perspectives from administrators, student teachers, and a cooperating teacher. The university coordinator and middle school principal share the reasoning behind the new model, and two student teachers and their cooperating teacher discuss their experiences as members of a coteaching trio.

    • Poudre’s and Colorado State University’s Partnership

      A New Teacher’s Journey

      In this segment, Chris Case, Celia Bell, and Nick Baltzell, teachers at Fort Collins High School (CO), look back on their clinical preparation. The three graduates of the professional development school spearheaded by the Poudre School District and Colorado State University share how the program benefited them, how the PDS allowed them to try new things in a safe environment, and how it helped them build long-lasting relationships.

    • Colorado State University

      Preparing Teachers for Diverse Students and Settings

      In this brief video, education leaders from Fort Collins High School and Colorado State University discuss their work preparing teacher candidates for special education situations and other diverse student needs. From understanding IEPs to tapping school-based counseling resources to differentiating instruction in both mainstreamed and self-contained classrooms, the program strives to expose candidates to a wide variety of students and settings, say Josh Richey, dean of students at the high school, and Wendy Fothergill and Juliana Searle, program advisers.

    • Fort Collins High School and Colorado State University

      Advice on Partnership Building

      AACTE sat down with faculty and administrators from Colorado State University and Fort Collins High School to solicit their advice for schools and educator preparation programs looking to start a similar clinical partnership.

    • Fort Collins High School Teachers

      Why I Teach

      In this final video segment from the Research-to-Practice Spotlight on Colorado State University’s programs and partnerships, both new and experienced teachers from Fort Collins High School share their passion for teaching the next generation.

  • 2014 Series

    The 2014 Research to Practice Spotlight Series focuses on clinical preparation. The first installment presents a general overview of what we know about how research is informing the development of strong, clinically based preparation programs. Featuring programs from Montclair State University and Winthrop University, researchers, educator preparation faculty, and graduates share their knowledge and experiences about the importance reorienting their programs around clinical practice.

    Montclair State University and Winthrop University

    • Foundational Research
    • Teacher Residency Program
    • Teacher Residency Program – A Teacher's Experience
    • Principal Preparation
    • Principal Preparation – A Graduate's Perspective